Don’t Fear Mothra – Her Eyes Inspired Your Glasses’ Anti-Reflective Coating

If you like the way the anti-reflective (AR) coating on your eyeglasses reduces glare, you can thank Mothra – or a real-life moth – for that.

Godzilla vs. Mothra | Zenni Optical

That’s because moths’ eyes are covered with a special film that eliminates reflections. This is necessary because of their well-known attraction to flames.

RuPaul | Zenni Optical

No, not that kind of flame! This kind:

A moth to a flame | Zenni Optical

If moths’ eyes reflected light, it would alert predators to their presence. But moths’ eyes are coated with a super-thin film structured in a hexagonal pattern of bumps that are so tiny they are smaller than the wavelength of visible light. These bumps reduce reflections from flames or other light sources by matching the wavelength of visible light, which blocks the light’s reflections.

Moth eye does not reflect light | Zenni Optical

AR coatings on eyeglasses take their cue from the eyes of moths. They work in a similar way, using a super-thin layer of metal oxide to reduce reflection by matching a reflected wave of light with an equal and opposite “incident wave” (roughly oversimplified, an interfering wave), which causes the two waves to cancel each other out.

Reflective light diagram | Zenni Optical

You don’t have to be a scientist, or even an accomplished graph reader, to see that the red wave of the reflection is equally matched by the black incident wave of the AR coating, which blocks the reflection on the lens as effectively as Jerry Kramer blocked Jethro Pugh in the Ice Bowl. (What? Ask a football fan or Google it.)

Jerry Kramer Ice Bowl Block | Zenni Optical

AR coatings are highly recommended for eyeglasses. They’re especially useful with high-index prescription lenses, because high-index lenses are thinner, lighter, and flatter than standard- and mid-index lenses, and therefore tend to reflect more light than lower index lenses do.

Before and After Anti-Reflective Coating for Glasses | Zenni Optical

But all lenses, even non-prescription lenses, benefit from AR coating, especially sunglasses.

Sunglasses with anti-reflective coating | Zenni Optical

However, one of the most important uses of AR coating will not involve sunglasses, unless you’re this guy.

Corey Hart in Sunglasses | Zenni Optical

For most people, who, unlike Corey Hart, don’t wear their sunglasses at night, AR coating is a must-have for driving glasses, prescription or non-prescription sunglasses, or clear prescription lenses. AR coating is great for reducing glare from streetlights, stoplights, taillights, and oncoming headlights. It’s especially good at decreasing the “halo” effect.

Model dressed as an angel with a halo | Zenni Optical

Wait, not that halo effect – that one should only be increased! Multiplied, even, at every possible opportunity. Here is the halo effect you want to reduce:

Halo effect | Zenni Optical

AR coating has daytime and indoor uses, too. It’s great for people who spend a lot of time on the computer, since it reduces glare from the monitor, which can cause eyestrain.

A woman who needs protection from glare | Zenni Optical

AR coating performs a great cosmetic function, too. It greatly decreases the reflection on eyeglasses’ lenses from external indoor and outdoor light sources. With AR coating, people looking at you while you’re wearing glasses will see your eyes rather than what’s reflected on the lenses. This is an excellent feature to have, unless you’re acting in Alfred Hitchcock’s Strangers on a Train.

Strangers on a Train still - Glasses with glare | Zenni Optical

If you haven’t seen that movie, check it out. It’s one of Hitchcock’s best.
 
In a minute we’re going to examine the three main types of AR coatings available for eyeglasses’ lenses: standard, hydrophobic, and oleophobic. They all work the same way, by blocking reflection and reducing glare with one or more layers of metal oxide that (remember the moth) allow more light to pass through the lens.

Before & after glasses anti-glare | Zenni Optical

But first, let’s dispose of the most common misconception about AR coatings: that they tint the lens. This is not true. AR coatings are clear and colorless and invisible on the lens.

Zenni Optical Eye Glasses with invisible AR coating

But there is a color-based way to tell if your lenses have AR coating. Sometimes people will think that, because reflections on the lenses are not entirely eliminated, their glasses don’t have AR coating, even though they ordered it.
 
To see if your eyeglasses have AR coating, hold the glasses parallel to the ground, with the temple arms (the stems that go behind your ear) up or down. Angle the glasses so you can see reflections on the lenses. If the reflections look green or purple, your lenses have AR coating.

High power lenses | Zenni Optical

Here’s why: The reflections will look green or purple, or both green and purple, because AR coating blocks waves that are in the green-to-purple wavelength of the spectrum of visible light. That’s why these colors are reflected on the lenses. If that’s not confusing enough, here’s a chart that will really have you scratching your head, unless you’re an optics geek:

Optics diagram for antireflective coating | Zenni Optical

Now that your brain has recovered (we hope), let’s look at those three main types of AR coatings: standard, hydrophobic, and oleophobic. Standard AR coating, which is $4.95 at Zenni Optical, and which can cost north of $100 at other optical retailers, does a great job of reducing reflections on eyeglasses lenses.
 
But there’s a big difference between standard AR coating and hydrophobic, which is $8.95 at Zenni, and oleophobic, which is $14.95 at Zenni. These AR coatings can cost as much as $200 at other optical retailers.
 
The hydrophobic AR coating is called that because although it blocks reflections the same way the standard AR coating does, it’s also water (hydro) resistant (phobic). It puts a slick surface on the lens that resists the buildup of water-based moisture, which is important to have when you’re watching a tearjerker like The Best Man Holiday for the 87th time.

The hydrophobic and oleophobic AR coatings make your eyeglasses’ lenses easier to clean than lenses with the standard AR coating. You can do this experiment yourself. If you have a pair of glasses with standard AR coating and a pair with hydrophobic or oleophobic AR coating, clean each pair with the cloth that comes with your Zenni glasses. It’s much easier to clean the hydrophobic or oleophobic pair than the standard pair, right? The cloth slides right across the surface of the hydrophobic- or oleophobic-coated lenses, while on the pair with the standard AR coating there’s a little drag on the lens.

Rupaul again! | Zenni Optical

Stop it! Behave. It’s not that kind of flame and not that kind of drag.
 
The oleophobic AR coating is called that because in addition to resisting water the way the hydrophobic AR coating does, it also resists oil and grease (that’s the “oleo” part, as in “oleomargarine,” which is what margarine used to be called).

Magarine | Zenni Optical

The oleophobic AR coating has a slick surface on the lens that, like the hydrophobic AR coating, resists the buildup of water moisture on the lens and makes the lenses easier to clean than lenses with the standard AR coating.
 
But it also protects against smudging from fingerprints as well as facial oils. This is useful when you don’t want to use your superpowers to clean your glasses, which would give away your secret identity.

A couple kissing | Zenni Optical

Zenni also offers special mirror-finish oleophobic AR coatings for sunglasses. These come in gold, silver, and blue, and each is $19.95. The back of the lens has the AR coating, and the front of the lens has the reflective mirror-finish coating. The gold mirror finish looks great with frames that are gold, red, brown, or tortoiseshell, such as frame A10102114.

Gold mirror finish sunglasses | Zenni Optical

The silver mirror finish looks great with any frame color or style, especially A10102412.

Silver mirror finish sunglasses | Zenni Optical

The blue mirror finish looks great with silver, black, gray, blue, or gold frames, such as 521814, and is especially good at reflecting harmful blue light.

Man wearing sunglasses with blue mirror finish | Zenni Optical

Or check out this beauty in the blue mirror finish. The frame (A10161222) looks great, too.

Woman wearing sunglasses with blue mirror finish | Zenni Optical

Speaking of reflecting harmful blue light, soon we’ll be launching our newest AR coating, which is specially designed to block blue light. Keep checking the Zenni Blog – and website – for details!
 

4 Responses

  1. The Doctor said I need to have “PRISIM” in the glasses or they will not do me any good. He gave this web site to order these.

    P. Distance 68 mm

    R. Distance +2.50 sphere, Cylinder+0.25, Axis 120, Prism 1.5 Base Down
    L. Distance +2.00 shpere, Ctkubder +050, Axis 070 Prism 1.5 Base Up

    Readers
    Date of examination 3/18/2014 Dr. Tsang

    • Dr. Tsang is looking out for your best interests, Pamela, by recommending Zenni! He knows we can provide high-quality, inexpensive lenses that will include your prism, farsightedness (the sphere section), and astigmatism (the cylinder and axis sections) corrections. Your eye doctor also knows that we have a wide range of eyeglasses frames in all the latest and traditional styles. I picked a frame that will accommodate your pupillary distance (PD) of 68, and ran your prescription numbers through our website. I’m happy to confirm that we recommend the 1.61 high-index single-vision lens, for $19.95. The prism correction is an additional $9.95. So now all you have to do is pick a frame you like that will fit you and accommodate your PD, decide if you want a tint, choose an anti-reflective coating (this is highly recommended, and the oleophobic AR coating, for $14.95, is the best), and you’ll be all set with a great pair of glasses that will cost you considerably less than $100. For more information, you may telephone Customer Service, at 800-211-2105, where any of our knowledgeable representatives will be happy to assist you. Good luck!

  2. Liz G says:

    Hi there! Any chance we can get an update on the “newest AR coating, which is specially designed to block blue light” you mention in the last paragraph? I tried writing to customer service to ask about it, but they claimed that the coating you were talking about was the “Blue Mirror Finish with fingerprint resistant oleophobic coating”. This doesn’t make sense to me because you say the blue mirror finish is available in this same post where you say the blue-blocking coating is NOT available, so I assume the blue-blocker is something different. Can you clarify and provide an update about the ETA? Thanks!

    • Thanks for your question, Liz. I regret that the response from customer service did not accurately address your question. You are correct that the Blue Mirror Finish with fingerprint resistant oleophobic coating is not the same as the blue-blocking coating. The latter is not yet being offered by Zenni, and I’m afraid I don’t have an ETA for it. All I can say at this point is to keep checking our website. When we do start offering it, we will note its availability prominently on our website, and I will write a blog post about it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>