Why Your Glasses Are A Great Conversation Starter

I recently started wearing glasses and no one at work said a thing. This surprised me as these were in-your-face glasses, so big and wine-red that you had to be in need of a pair yourself not to notice them. How could they resist?
 

 
It was as if they were too polite. Or maybe they just didn’t have the words for the new me. After all, I had undergone a complete makeover overnight. And so they continued to smile their polite smiles without ever saying a word. I let this go on for a day. And then I got sick of it.
 
I could have simply asked: “So, what do you think of my new glasses?” I knew that would put an end to all the politeness. Instead, I decided to embrace the new me, to really give them something to talk about.
 
Each day I reinvented myself. One day, I was sleek and sophisticated with my wine-red frames. The next, I went with a simple, circular and Lennonesque pair. But still, I didn’t get noticed. So I went baby blue and glittery. And that did the trick. Or so I thought.
 
It was Molly, my colleague, who noticed first. “There’s something different about you today. I can’t put my finger on it,” she said, “Oh, now I see it… You got a haircut!”  I couldn’t believe it. A haircut! And so I let her have it: “Today I’m a baby blue pixie. Yesterday I was a Lennon impersonator. And the day before that, I indulged the geek in me.”
 
A mistaken haircut was all it took. Suddenly, the spell had been broken. Before I knew it, I was being complimented on my glitz and glam. They even asked me where I got them. Someone else remarked that I couldn’t have found a more perfect pair.
 
They liked the new me and suddenly, my glasses were the most talked about accessory in the office. At least they were for the last 20 minutes of that day.
 
Here’s what I learned through the process: your glasses can be the most powerful conversation starter you have. You just need to know how to use them. In my case, it took a few bold attempts before people really noticed. But once I brought it up, none of that mattered. Once I gave them permission, my bold frames became the topic of conversation.
 
Whether you’re a veteran glasses wearer or a newbie looking to get the most out of your frames, here are some tips for you.
 
1. Introduce Yourself
Unless people know you well, they’re unlikely to comment on your glasses. That’s your job. You need to start the conversation. Show people there’s something to talk about. A simple, “So, do you like my new glasses?” would suffice. Be sure to draw attention to the fact that they’re new glasses. This is a great way to get a conversation going. Keep in mind that this won’t work on complete strangers. They might mistake this for a pick up line.
 
2.  Let The Glasses Do The Talking
If you want your glasses to do the talking, you need a pair of statement glasses. These aren’t picked because they’re functional or comfortable. These specs intrigue people so much that they can’t help but say something. It might be something as simple as, “Oh, I love your glasses”. That’s enough to get the conversation flowing.
 
3. A New Look, A New You
Maybe statement glasses aren’t your thing. We’re not all cut out for that. They require loads of confidence to pull off. If you’re not in the mood to get chatty with people, I suggest you leave them at home. There is a more simple way to start conversations. Variety!
 
One pair of glasses is not enough. You need at least 5. With a variety, you can reinvent yourself every other day. And nothing says come talk to me like a new look. Again, a lot depends on the glasses you choose. Think of how you want people to respond and how you want people to perceive you.
 
Maybe you want to make people laugh. Or perhaps, you’re looking for something more authoritative. Keep your purpose in mind because people will ask. And if you choose your glasses correctly, people get curious. Trust me.
 
For most people, glasses start off as a functional necessity. But if you know how to wear them, they can quickly become one of the most intriguing accessories you own.

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